The Laughing Heart by Charles Bukowski

Animation and Illustration: Bradley Bell
Poem by: Charles Bukowski
Spoken by: Tom Waits
Music: Grizzly Bear - Foreground

“I meet you.
I remember you.
Who are you?
You destroy me.
You’re so good for me.
How could I have known that you were made to the size of my body?
You’re great. How wonderful. You’re great.
How slow all of a sudden.
And how sweet.
More than you can know.
You destroy me.
You’re so good for me.
You destroy me.
You’re so good for me.
Plenty of time.
Please.
Take me.
Deform me, make me ugly.
Why not you?
Why not you in this city and in this night so like the others you can’t tell the difference?
Please…”
— Marguerite Duras — Hiroshima Mon Amour

Paradelle About Leaving

I am reminded of a silent moment
I am reminded of a silent moment
Sitting here stuttering the dead ends of days
Sitting here stuttering the dead ends of days
Silent dead days stuttering
“I am here reminded of a moment of the ends.”

The endings usually seem formulaic
The endings usually seem formulaic
Acute deja vu the most common complaint
Acute deja vu the most common complaint
The most formulaic deja vu common
The acute endings usually seem complaint.

If one was to reach out past the moment
If one was to reach out past the moment
A vessel driving through the spine of time
A vessel driving through the spine of time
If vessel movement was past time
The one driving out to the spine through a reach.

I, the silent complaint, reach a vessel
Usually of the most acute stuttering
Dead out of time. If the deja vu end
Am one reminded here
The common past was driving the moment
Seem sitting through days of formulaic endings of a spine.

© Matt Elliott 2008. All Rights Reserved.
A paradelle by Liam Elliot.

Word of the day: January / Enero.


The ancient Roman calendar had ten months (March to December), six of which had thirty days and four had thirty-one days, giving a total of three hundred and four days, plus a winter period of sixty days during which no date was recorded.

According to tradition, the second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius, established in the eighth century BC the months of January and February.

January — Latin, Januarius — with thirty-one days, was created in homage to the god Janus, who ruled the entrances and beginnings, and became the first month of the year.



El antiguo calendario romano tenía diez meses, desde marzo hasta diciembre, seis de treinta días y cuatro de treinta y un días, lo que daba un total de trescientos cuatro, más un lapso invernal de unos sesenta días durante el cual no se registraba la fecha.

Según la tradición, el segundo rey de Roma, Numa Pompilio, estableció en el siglo VIII a. de C. los meses de enero y febrero.

Enero —en latín, Januarius—, con treinta y un días, fue creado en homenaje al dios Jano, que regía las entradas y los comienzos, y pasó a ser el primer mes del año, desplazando a marzo, pues los cónsules se elegían en enero.

Source / Fuente.